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Painting Kitchen Walls Tips

painting-kitchen-wallsPaint is a simple and cheap approach to overhaul a kitchen. In case you’re never painted a kitchen, it can appear like a staggering errand, particularly with regards to picking the hues and complete for painting kitchen dividers.

Yellow, red, blue, white, green and dark are all famous paint hues for kitchen dividers. Yellow is a merry shade that can make an inviting space while red can feel serious; both are accepted to animate the voracity. Blue, white, green and dark are all the more serene, quieting shades.

When it comes to paint, there are two types to choose from: oil paint and latex paint. Oil paint is very resistant to water, which is why it works well in kitchens. It also tends to be very shiny, so it’s mainly used on cabinets, woodwork and doors. Latex paint is the more popular option for kitchen walls and it comes in a few different finishes.

Selecting the right paint finish is essential when painting a high-traffic space. Paints come in a number of finishes, from flat to high-gloss. The general rule of thumb is the more matte the finish, the harder it is to clean. If a finish is glossy, it tends to be more “scrubbable.”
Since kitchens are such a busy part of a home and often need extra cleaning, a satin or semi-gloss finish is the best options. Satin and eggshell finishes are commonly believed to be the same, but in fact, satin is a bit shinier. Satin finishes are easy to clean and good at standing up to mildew, stains and dirt.
A semi-gloss finish is even glossier than a satin one, but it reflects a lot of light without being too over the top. Another tough finish that’s easy to scrub, it’s a smart choice for the kitchen and especially your backsplash. Glossier finishes tend to highlight imperfections in the wall, so this isn’t the best option if your walls have a few dents and dings.
It’s also important to purchase high-quality paint when painting your kitchen walls. By choosing a well-known paint, you’ll ensure the one you’ve chosen won’t peel or chip after a little wear and tear. If you’re not sure which paint brands are best, ask for help when you visit your hardware store, and a sales associate can give you detailed information.

When it’s time to paint, make sure to prime your walls to prepare them for the new paint you’ve selected. And make sure you’re using the same type of paint that’s already on your kitchen walls. If you try to paint latex paint on top of oil-based paints, the paint will peel and chip. It’s best to use the same paint that’s already on your walls.

Kitchen Lighting Types

kitchen-lighting# Task lighting provides illumination for specific tasks, such as cooking, reading, etc. It can be located on the wall above the work area or under the cabinets above the area.

# General illumination maintains a specific light level in a room; in a kitchen such illumination may include recessed and over-cabinet lighting. Incandescent lights, which tend to be more yellow, and fluorescent lights, which are whiter, are good types of general lighting.

# Highlighting and accenting brings the light level up to about three times the general illumination level in order to point up a specific feature, such as a decorative range hood, carved cabinet doors, etc. Toe-space lighting, a good example of this type of lighting, makes cabinets appear to float above the floor; and over-cabinet lighting makes cabinets look higher by expanding the space above them.

 

Do-it-Yourself Low Cost Kitchen Remodeling Tips

diy-kitchen-remodelYou can save a lot of money on your remodel by installing the kitchen cabinets yourself.

HANGING CABINETS TIPS:

– Remove all cabinet doors and drawers to make them easier to install and to avoid damaging them during installation.
– You’ll need a pencil, tape measure and level to mark the exact position of the cabinets on the walls.
– It is easier to install the upper cabinets first, starting in the corner(s).
– To install upper cabinets, determine their location in relation to the base cabinets. Add the height of the base cabinet to the thickness of your countertop (base cabinets are usually 34-1/2 tall and countertops are usually 1-1/2 inches thick.) Then add 18 inches for the space in between the upper and lower cabinets. Your total should be about 54 inches. This is where the bottom of the upper cabinet will sit.
If the floor isn’t level, find the highest point along the wall where the cabinets will be installed. Mark a chalk line across the wall then attach a 2×4 ledger into the wall studs to help support the cabinets while installing.
– Cut holes for the water lines on the back of the cabinet.
If cutouts are needed for electrical boxes, trace the box with lipstick then hold the cabinet in the correct place and press firmly. The lipstick will transfer to the cabinet. Connect the lines, drill a pilot hole and make the cut-out with a jig saw.
– Make sure you fasten the cabinets to wall studs. If a cabinet hits only one stud, use a toggle bolt to help keep it secure.
– When hanging cabinets, check frequently for plumb and levelness. Don’t fully tighten the screws until the cabinets are plumb, flush and level. Use shims to help achieve evenness.
– Use clamps to hold together cabinets while securing to wall.

FINDING BARGAINS :

– When shopping for appliances, look for floor models. You’re usually only giving up the box the item came in. Be sure to check with the dealer about the warranty. They might be willing to extend the warranty to unload the item.
– Shop in early fall for appliances. Last year’s models need to go to make room for the next year’s models.
– Shop scratch-and-dent appliance sales. Make sure the scratches are cosmetic and not structural.
– Ask for volume discounts, some places offer discounts if you buy all your appliances in one place.
– When shopping for windows and doors, don’t just check the big box retailers, go to your local building supplier, (where your contractor shops). The savings can be up to 20 percent.
– Look for cabinet retailers or wholesalers that offer free design services such as measuring your kitchen and planning your layout.

– Go directly to the place that sells granite slabs. You can save 25 to 30 percent by cutting out the middle man.

THINGS TO KNOW ABOUT GUTTING A KITCHEN :
– To remove cabinets, unscrew them from the wall and pull them off. Don’t use a sledgehammer, it will be much neater and the cabinets can be reused.
– When disconnecting the supply lines to the sink, always have a bucket handy to catch any leftover water.
– Before taking a sledgehammer to drywall, use a small hammer to make holes in the wall to check for any electrical or plumbing behind the wall.
– If the interior of the wall is clear of electrical or plumbing lines, use a reciprocating saw to cut out the wall section that you want to remove.

– Use a box fan in a window to help suck out the construction dust.

Pick The Proper Kitchen Faucet

The kitchen faucet’s fundamental capacity is to administer hot and chilly water for washing dishes, sustenance and hands. In any case, past that it’s a noteworthy player in characterizing the style of your kitchen plan.

With all the new — and old — outlines, completes and mounting styles out there, it’s anything but difficult to get overpowered while picking a fixture. Having the fundamental data available will make things less demanding. This is what to consider.

Deck-mounted faucets. With these the faucet mounts directly to the countertop and not the sink. If you are installing an undermount sink, you have the option of mounting the faucet directly on the countertop. When installing a deck-mounted faucet, make sure to allow more than a finger’s width behind the faucet for cleaning.

Pros: Deck-mounted faucets provide a seamless look that’s especially well suited to contemporary kitchens (but they come in all styles).

Cons: They occupy space on the countertop. Also, you may find an accumulation of water, dirt and grime between the faucet and the wall.

Mounting Styles

Sink-mounted faucets.
There are many different kitchen faucet and sink designs, but they are not always compatible. If you are working with an existing sink, check how many mounting holes it has. New faucets come in one-, two-, three- or four-hole varieties.

When you are replacing an existing faucet that requires fewer holes than you have, look for a new faucet that comes with an escutcheon plate (a deck plate at the base) to cover up the unneeded sink holes. This will do the trick on many standard sinks.

Pros: This is a great option if you want a quick update to your kitchen and want to reuse your existing sink.

Cons: Your sink will limit your faucet style options.

Hands-free faucets. This great hands-free option is activated by a sensor. Notice the handle at the side, which allows you to adjust the temperature and flow rate.

Pros: No hands! These versions operate with a sensor that detects light contact (some are activated by motion) that opens the valve. They are great for arthritic hands and children. They have the advantage of shutting off automatically to conserve water. Plus, you won’t ever worry about an overflowing sink.

Cons: There is no way to adjust the temperature or the water flow through the touch mode. That has to be done manually, and some people find it aggravating. Also, these faucets require an occasional battery change for the sensor to work.

Wall-mounted faucets. Take care when placing a wall-mounted faucet to make sure it will work together with your sink. The distance the water spout projects will determine whether the two will be compatible. This can be more of an issue with a double sink.

Pros: Countertop cleanup is a breeze.

Cons: You’ll need to take extra care in colder climates (if local code allows installation on an outside wall) to insulate against freezing. Also, the plumber must get the spacing and location exactly right. If there is a wall stud in the way, it will need to be relocated so that the faucet and handles can be installed where you need them.

 

Painting Kitchen Backsplashes

You can paint your kitchen backsplash a strong shading, utilize a stencil, or even make the look of false tiles utilizing painter’s tape.

In the event that you’d like to paint your kitchen backsplash, you’ll have to make sense of the hues you’d like to utilize. It’s essential to consider alternate hues you have in the room before settling on the ideal shade.

In the event that your kitchen has dull cupboards, pick a lighter shade for the backsplash to keep the room from feeling too overwhelming. In the event that you have white or light-shaded cupboards, a splendid or darker paint shading could function admirably. Since it’s entirely simple to paint your backsplash, you can don’t hesitate to have a great time here. On the off chance that you wind disliking the shading you pick, you can simply paint over it!

A simple, solid color can work on a kitchen backsplash, but chances are it’ll feel too boring over time. If you want to add some drama to your walls without relying on tiles, try stenciling a design, favorite quote, food-related words, or a beloved family recipe on your backsplash.

An easy and affordable way to update a room, stencils can also create a striking backsplash. They’re also much less permanent than tiles, and you can easily paint over them when you’re ready for something new.

If you love the look of tiles but prefer to use paint on your backsplash, you can create faux tiles with paint. This can be a long, tedious process, but the results are worth it. Using the tape to create different sized “tiles,” you can mimic a number of different materials, from glass to stone. If you’d like to incorporate a bunch of colors into your backsplash, this technique is the way to go.

You can also use chalkboard paint to create a unique backsplash in your kitchen. The classic black chalkboard color works well with white or light-colored cabinets, while a lighter shade is recommended for dark cabinets. A chalkboard backsplash will provide a canvas where you can write down grocery lists, recipes or special notes for your family. Easy to wipe clean, chalkboard paint works well in a space where there tends to be grease and spattered food.

Famous Kitchen Layouts

# U-Shaped Layout

The U-shape evolved as storage needs increased. It provides a massive expanse of counter and storage space as well as great flexibility. The G-shape is the basic U with another little leg. It is great for a one-cook kitchen and allows the work area to be spread out.

# L-Shaped Layout

For more privacy when cooking, choose an L-shaped layout which forces the traffic out of the work area. For more interaction with family and guests, try an L-shape with an island. The L-shaped kitchen has a main wall of cabinets with either the sink or range and a shorter run of cabinets placed in an L-configuration.

# Galley or Corridor-Style

The galley, or corridor, kitchen has two straight runs on either side. Typically the sink is on one side and the range is on the other. The drawback to this design is traffic flow. A simple, one-wall design can be transformed into a galley shape with the addition of an island opposite the wall of cabinets. Islands help replace needed storage that is lost in an open kitchen design with limited wall cabinets.

# Zone Design

To really break up the different areas of the kitchen, consider a zone design. In this kitchen, a separate work station exists for cooking, eating and even cleaning, allowing space for several helpers all at once.

# Essential Work Triangle

The three points of the frequently mentioned work triangle are the range, sink and refrigerator. Appliances can be broken up with the classic shapes; for example, the cooktop and wall ovens might be in different areas. Two sinks are important for a two-cook kitchen.

Clean Smelly Disposal, Here Its Tips

I’ve poured all kinds of things down our kitchen garbage disposal to make it clean and sweet-smelling — orange and grapefruit peels, dried-out lemons, baking soda and vinegar.

Here’s how it works:

  • Fit a stopper into the sink, and fill with hot water and a squirt of dish detergent.
  • Turn on the disposal and let the soapy water drain, pushing gunk down the drain with it.
  • Throw 3 or 4 ice cubes and a handful of large-grain salt, such as Kosher, down the drain and run the disposal.
  • Flush with water, and you’ve got a clean disposal. Grind up a few lemons if you want a fresh, citrus smell.

About Zinc Countertops

Zinc is a modern looking ledge material that is got special attributes. Fundamentally, zinc builds up a patina with age that some mortgage holders truly like.

Zinc responds with water, fingerprints, lemon juice, and a wide range of different things that arrive on a kitchen counter. In the end, the imprints mix together and leave the ledge with a lovely, dull blue-dim patina. In any case, that can take a year — quite a while in the event that you flinch at seeing a spot.

Zinc is will undoubtedly disillusion on the off chance that you attempt to keep a gleaming new look by cleaning the ledge as often as possible. It’s conceivable, however why do as such much work? You’d be in an ideal situation with stainless steel, since it stays glossy with no extraordinary exertion.

What’s Likeable About Zinc?

1. Zinc is a less-pristine alternative to stainless steel because it’s a “living metal” that changes color over time in reaction to its surroundings.

2. It’s naturally non-porous, so you can clean it with just soap and water.

3. It has anti-bacterial properties similar to copper, making it a great surface for prepping food.

4. The metal is easy to work with, so it’s easy to include decorative edges in various shapes and styles. Fabricators also can create an integral zinc sink by welding parts together and grinding seams smooth, making cleanup a breeze.

What’s Not to Like?

1. Zinc is soft, so it scratches easily if you cut directly on it. Be sure to have cutting boards handy.

2. It can warp if someone sets down a pot hotter than about 300 degrees (set down a red-hot iron pot and the zinc could melt). Be sure to tell guests not to set hot items on your zinc countertop! Keep trivets nearby.

3. Price is an eye-opener. A zinc countertop costs $150 to $200 per sq. ft., depending on the thickness of the metal (you’ll want 15-gauge material that’s at least .060 thick). Stainless steel costs less, and granite is even cheaper.

Other Cost Considerations

1. Zinc is an expensive material that’s not for everybody. Make sure your decision to install a zinc countertop is in line with the style and features of other homes in your neighborhood. Less-expensive options may have a better return on your investment.

2. You’ll pay an additional 10% to 15% installation charge for unusual or complex countertop shapes.

3. Be sure to get several bids before committing to a zinc countertop. Ask if your countertop fabricator has had experience making zinc countertops, and ask to see examples of their work. Try getting bids from sheet metal fabricators, not just companies that specialize in installing countertops.

4. Some zinc sheets are “seconds” — meaning they already have stains and discolorations. If that kind of patina isn’t objectionable, you can save 10% to 20% on your countertop by opting for seconds.

Buy a Range Tips

At the point when settling on new range, this is what you’ll have to think about elements, style, cost, and execution.

Types of Ranges and Costs

There are three standard freestanding range types: electric, gas, and dual-fuel (a gas stovetop with an electric-powered oven). Each type includes:

  • A stovetop (with a minimum of four burners — many premium models have five)
  • An oven (usually two racks and one oven — many premium ranges will have a larger oven with three racks or two ovens)

If you want your range to look like it’s built into your cabinetry, there are two additional options. Both are somewhat rare and may require special ordering through an appliance dealer:

  • Slide-in ranges. The range fits between two cabinets and the edges of the cooktop rest on top of the counters, eliminating gaps. They’re available in gas, electric, and dual-fuel range styles.
  • Drop-in ranges. They‘re fitted into a pre-built cabinet opening with a cabinet panel across the bottom. The panel eliminates the bottom storage drawer typical of most ranges. They’re available in electric power only.

1. Electric Ranges

Electric ranges feature three options for cooktop heating elements.

Coil-top models have exposed heating elements. Cookware goes directly on the elements. They’re the least expensive ranges you can buy ($389 to $650) and typically are available in only two colors: black or white. Features include:

  • Porcelain-enamel cooktop finish
  • Indicator lights that let you know when the burner’s coil heating element is on
  • Dials and knobs for oven and burner control

Coil-top ranges at the top end of the price range usually include:

  • Digital displays for heating temperatures and cooking times
  • Single storage drawers for cookware
  • Large oven windows

Drawbacks:

  • Coil heating elements are slow to heat up and cool.
  • Heating elements must be removed for thorough cleaning.
  • Indicator lights only go on when the cooktop’s coils are switched on, but not when the coils are off but still hot (and cooling down).
  • Coil cooktops tend to distribute heat unevenly.

Smooth-top models have solid disk or radiant heating elements beneath a one-piece ceramic glass cooktop that makes cleanup easy. Smooth tops are the best-selling ranges because of their performance, price, and good looks.

Mid-range models start at $550. Standard features typically include:

  • Standard electric ovens
  • Electronic oven controls with preset cooking options and digital displays
  • Indicator lights that let you know when the heating elements are on and when the surface area is hot and cooling down
  • Self-cleaning functions

Premium smooth-top ranges include fast-cooking convection ovens that use fans to circulate heat so foods bake or roast more quickly and evenly; they can slash cooking times by up to 30%. Premium models start at around $900 and typically include:

  • Hidden heating elements (rather than an exposed wire element sitting on the bottom of the oven’s interior) for easier oven cleaning
  • Warming centers that keep prepared foods warm
  • A fifth stovetop heating element

Smooth-top models with two ovens start at around $1,300.

Drawbacks:

  • Glass ceramic surfaces are a cinch to clean but prone to scratching.
  • You can’t use cast-iron, stoneware, or glass cookware on the cooktop because they can scratch. Also, glass and stoneware are poor heat conductors, which increases cooking time. The intense heat that cast iron creates can actually shut down the range. Stainless steel and copper are best.
  • Overheated metal cookware may bond with the cooktop’s glass ceramic surface.

Induction-top models are known for speedy stovetop cooking. Their burners don’t generate heat like other stovetops. Instead, they use magnetic technologies to turn compatible cookware into a heat source. If you can stick a magnet to your cookware, you can use it. As a result, the induction top’s glass ceramic surface remains cool to the touch.

Induction stovetops can boil water about 50% faster than other stoves. They’re also energy-efficient; 90% of the energy they generate is used to cook food (a standard electric stovetop uses about 65% and a gas stovetop uses 50%).

They’re typically equipped with convection ovens which speed cooking time by using fans to circulate and boost heat transfer. Prices range from $1,200 to $3,200. Induction ranges include:

  • Control lockouts that prevent the range from being accidentally turned on
  • Touch screens instead of knobs and dials
  • Hidden baking elements for easier cleaning
  • Warming drawers

Drawbacks:

  • Not all your pots and pans will be compatible with the induction stovetop. Aluminum, copper, glass, and some types of stainless cookware won’t work.
  • They’re expensive.

2. Gas Ranges

Besides the visual control of the flame and quick, uniform heating, benefits include:

  • Compatibility with all cooktop and oven cookware
  • Surface burners and ovens that still work when the power goes out (but not a fan-driven convection feature)
  • Lower operating costs than electric ranges — depending on your local utility rates

Heat output for gas range burners is described in Btu (British thermal units). Burners range from 5,000 to 20,000 Btu. Ranges with high-heat burners usually cost more.

General retail price range: $399 to $5,300.

Standard models are the least expensive gas ranges you can buy and typically are available in two basic colors: black or white. Prices start at $399 and usually include the following features:

  • Porcelain-enamel cooktops
  • Burners that don’t burn as hot as more expensive ranges (average 9,500 Btu)
  • Storage drawers
  • Cast-iron grates over the burners
  • Dials and knobs for oven and burner control
  • Oven windows that are typically much smaller than those on more expensive models

Mid-range models start around $650. Features typically include:

  • High-performance burners (up to 12,500 Btu)
  • Digital settings for cooking times and temperatures
  • Storage drawers for pots and pans
  • Oven control lockouts that stop unintended changes to oven settings
  • A self-cleaning oven
  • Easy-to-clean steel grates over the burners
  • White, black, and stainless steel color options

Premium models start at around $1,000; double-oven-type gas ranges start at around $1,600. Features typically include:

  • High-performance burners (up to 17,000 Btu)
  • A bonus fifth burner
  • A removable stovetop griddle
  • Electronic control panels for programmed cooking times
  • Convection ovens
  • Hidden baking elements for easier cleaning

Pro-style models start at around $1,700. They’re wider than standard ranges and have large oven capacities of 5.8 cubic feet and more. Additional features typically include:

  • A bonus fifth burner, with one being a super-hot burner of up to 20,000 Btu
  • Two convection ovens
  • Heavy-duty rollout cooking racks
  • Multiple color and metal options

Drawbacks:

  • Gas ranges tend to be more expensive then their electric range counterparts.
  • You need a natural gas line hooked up to your kitchen.

3. Dual-Fuel Ranges

These ranges combine the best of both worlds: a gas stovetop that chefs love with an electric-powered oven that provides even heat for baking. They come with a premium price tag of $2,000 to $7,500.

Features include:

  • Gas stovetops with five burners
  • One or two electric convection ovens
  • Glass touch screens for burner and oven controls
  • Wi-Fi-enabled programming so you can control oven features with your personal device

Size Does Matter

Freestanding ranges typically fall into two conventional widths: Standard ranges are approximately 30 inches wide; dual-fuel and pro-style gas ranges are 36 to 48 inches wide.

You’ll need to make sure your range’s oven cavity size is large enough to accommodate your cooking needs:

  • 2 to 3 cubic feet will accommodate households with one or two people.
  • 3 to 4 cubic feet will accommodate households with three or four people.
  • 4 cubic feet and up will accommodate households of four or more.

Gas or Electric?

If you don’t have a gas supply to your house, the answer is easy. But if you can go with either gas or electric, budget and cooking preferences play a significant role in deciding. Also, some people prefer electric ranges because of safety issues — there’s no chance of a gas leak. Here’s food for thought:

  • Popularity: Electric smooth-top ranges are the best sellers because of price and performance. They account for more than 60% of all ranges sold.
  • Budget: Electric ranges are typically less expensive than their gas counterparts. However, gas ranges are usually cheaper to operate, depending on whether your natural gas rates are lower than your electricity costs.
  • Cooking preferences: Listen to your inner chef. Many cooks prefer gas ranges because the burner flame works as a visual temperature gauge and can heat things up quickly. Most bakers prefer electric ovens because of the consistent and even heat they generate.

Here’s a surprising fact: There are no federal energy regulations for consumer ranges, so you won’t find a model that’s Energy Star certified.

Pick The Proper Stock Cabinets for Your Kitchen

Purchasing stock cabinets for your kitchen rebuild can spare you cash. Here are a few tips to help you settle on the right purchasing choice.

Purchasing stock cabinets rather than custom is a decent approach to spare generous time and cash on a kitchen redesign.

Stock cupboards spare you time since you don’t need to sit tight for them to be assembled. What’s more, they spare you cash since you aren’t paying for customizations.

What to Look For

Solid wood and plywood cabinets. They’ll give you better longevity and crisper details than pressed wood.

Walls at least ½-inch thick. They’re more sturdy.

Consistency of finish. Lesser quality cabinets often have irregular finishes and colors from one cabinet box to the next.

Full-extension hardware. It allows you to open drawers all the way and open doors almost 180 degrees to make access easier.

Dovetail joinery. Or a metal box. Drawer sides and backs that are stapled together won’t last as long.

Cost and Installation

The cost of quality stock cabinets for an average-sized kitchen generally runs $8,000 to $10,000. Semi-custom cabinets would cost about twice that. And full custom cabinets would cost even more.

There are some lower-cost stock alternatives, such as IKEA (as low as $2,500), but you’ll offset your savings with the hassle of difficult assembly — fine if you have the patience and skill.

But unless you’ve got professional building experience, actually installing kitchen cabinets isn’t a typical DIY job.

So carve out $100-$300 per cabinet (depending on labor rates in your area) to have them professionally installed.

The Drawbacks of Stock Cabinets

Finish and color choices are limited. The most likely options are painted white, natural wood, or stained maple and cherry.

Stock cabinets are only 36 inches tall. If you want taller cabinets, you’ll have to go semi-custom, which can take you up to 42 inches.

You could lose potential storage space. Filler strips are used to cover gaps created when the stock sizes don’t quite fill the space — whereas custom cabinets can be measured to take advantage of all space.

Extra details such as crown molding aren’t included. Mitered corners and furniture-style sides aren’t included either. However, you can add crown molding yourself later if you choose.

Warranties are limited. The industry standard is about 5 years, and they only cover product failure, not wear and tear.

Avoid These Kitchen Layout

It’s the day you’ve been longing for: It’s a great opportunity to arrange your kitchen rebuild. Think beyond practical boundaries, however ensure you’re not committing errors that’ll bring about you to lament the cash you spent and the burden you experienced.

# Going Overboard with Open Shelving

Yes, it’s popular. And it can look amazing, especially to show off a stunning collection of cookware, and to make your kitchen look unique. But give some serious thought to which shelves should be open. Open shelves for items you use often, such as plates and coffee cups, are a good idea because you use them often so they’ll stay clean. But if you use open shelves to store things you use infrequently, they’ll quickly become dust collectors. You’ll also want to avoid making your lowest cabinets open. They’re harder to clean and tend to fill with dust faster.

Still debating? Edie, the blogger behind “Life In Grace,” found the open shelves on her kitchen island impractical and dusty, but loved their look when installed above the countertops. “All the dust floating in the air will land on the lower open shelves and threaten to drive you to the brink of insanity,” she writes.

# Creating a Crowded Kitchen

Your kitchen wish list might be long, but make sure you’re not trying to squeeze too much into the space you have. Installing an island? Make sure it’s surrounded by at least three feet of space on all sides. And make sure you can walk around your dishwasher, even when it’s fully open.

If you’re not sure what will push your kitchen over the line from “full” to “stuffed,” the National Kitchen and Bath Association offers detailed measurement guidelines for every imaginable situation, like ensuring 15 inches of landing area around your microwave and refrigerator. The fridge also requires four feet of floor space for the door.

# Forgetting About the Garbage

Don’t forget to make room for either a can or compactor in your new kitchen. After all, now’s the time you can design a specific space to hide that ugly plastic box. Whether you stick it under a sink (maybe install a sliding system?) or even custom-cut a hole in your countertop for easy disposal, keep trash in mind when designing a beautiful room.

# Getting Overly Luxurious

Major kitchen remodels recoup less than 70% of their value upon sale. (A minor kitchen remodel will receive slightly better returns.) Unless you’re planning on staying in your home for a very long time, and having an über-high-end stove is really important to you, don’t waste your time and money on a splurge. Top-of-the-line appliances and other luxury upgrades just lighten your pocketbook — without adding much value.

# Neglecting to Properly Vent

Cooking dinner for a family of four can release more than a pint of water into the air — and if you’re using a gas range that number doubles (and adds carbon monoxide). Improperly vented, that liquid seeps into your walls, ceiling, and appliances where it can cause problems with mold and mildew. Make sure your ventilation systems are properly installed and lead outdoors, which keeps your kitchen cleaner and helps protect your home’s structural integrity.

The opportunity to reshape your kitchen into the workspace you’ve always dreamt of can be so tempting: Finally, a bigger island with enough room for all your groceries. At last, an upgraded refrigerator. But in your haste to redecorate, don’t forget to think things through — otherwise your fantasy kitchen could turn into your biggest regret.